A Night at the Entry (My First Venture in Reviewerdom)

Disclaimer

Bearing in mind  the advice  I was given by a failed stand up comedian who was not hindered by his inebriation nor hesitant  in flexing his Berklee educated brain (or flamboyant humor,)   I am  just going to endeavor to “write how I feel about the music ” seeing as I’m not a “real musician”.  Meaning that if you hate this review I’m sorry. These are  simply my personal impressions on my first venture into the land of reviewerdom and I’m no Reed Fischer. So with that said here is my review of Squares Three Theories release at the 7th Street Entry.

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I’ll admit to you that by the time I took a stool at the Entry I was fueled with expectations. Maybe that’s the double-edged sword of video promotion (Luke gets extra points for appearing with a cat in the opening clip) or maybe Squares just made that much of an impression on me during their set  at Zach Sobiech’s Varsity show.

View promo video here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xbaKr4VtQHQ&feature=player_embedded

The point is that when I paid my five dollars I expected a night brimming with psychedelicness, dark Euro-inspired melodies and  all the broodiness of Dante’s inferno which was the said inspiration behind Three Theories.

The first band that took the stage,  a gypsy/indie rock trio called The Sunny Era was probably the most indicative of what I had imagined and was consequently my favorite group of the night. Any artists that can utilize an accordion and violin flourishes and still make music that rocks hard instantly have my respect and probably my heart too. During the set my friend leaned over to me and made some remark about how this is the music I secretly love . It was in that moment that I realized The Sunny Era makes music audiences love but aren’t aware that they love until the band is on stage doing their thing. This was apparent from the way the small crowd that had accumulated was awkwardly trying to jam out with the traditional movements despite the fact that the atmosphere lent itself better to quiet intensity than rowdiness. Between vibrant rhythms ranging from flamenco-esque to marching, and the little additives like ghostly whistling which appeared in a brief part of one their songs , this band contains just enough drama and intrigue to keep one excited while not insulting the root they have planted in rock.  So I would  definitely see this band again even though I never totally understood anything the lead singer said.

The second band Fire in the Northern Firs was not anything I would have anticipated. I guess they were there to cater to the part of the crowd which was more concerned with music of the psychedelic variety. That being said I didn’t dislike them. The wall of sound they built with effects and vocals that swelled above the instrumentals  in a Karen O  fashion did not go unappreciated by my alt rock loving soul.  Seriously Carin Barno (of First Communion After Party) is a musical force to be reckoned with and the way she could exude so much energy moving one body part or singing one note would be enough to get me to come to their set if Fire in the Northern Firs ever played a Lolla stage like the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. As much as I liked  them though their performance led me off the path to the main act Squares.

Honestly after they went off the stage I felt kind of worn out, like I’d been playing the intensity game all night. I’m in the belief that show lineups should be more of a steady build up than a roller coaster and as much as I applauded the opening acts for making me “feel something” (which was the objective stated by Squares lead singer) I didn’t think the progression enabled Squares to do the same thing for me.

Now this is truly a matter of taste. Because as much as I did enjoy the Squares tumultuous lyrics, old world feel and percussion that seemed to ricochet off the melodies themselves the whole thing felt vaguely anticlimactic.

Although I left the show with a desire to see all these bands again in their own right, the bill gave me the feeling farmers often have after lightning storms, hopeful but just not quite fulfilled.

Check out the bands!

The Sunny Era
Fire in the Northern Firs
Squares

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